Tag Archives: audiobook

5 for Friday – Books I’ve Been Reading.

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These next few books, just happen to be mostly non-fiction ones.

Well, except for that last one. 🙂

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The Power of Meaning
by Emily Esfahani Smith 
(non-fiction) – worth a read

I won this book from a giveaway on Good Reads. I have yet to write a review, but maybe writing this will inspire me to finally do that. This book is thoroughly researched! I flagged over 20 pages. Skimming those pages, here is my takeaway:

  • There is a difference between a happy life and a meaningful life.
  • “The search for meaning is far more fulfilling than the pursuit of personal happiness.”  <–I may have been pursuing the wrong thing!
  • “Mental Illness is often the result of a person’s ability to tell a good story about his or her life.” <-Storytelling plays a huge role in the power of meaning!
  • Resilience is genetic, but those who are more sensitive to stress can learn it.
  • We are in an age when we are moving from a focus on materialistic values (which focuses on “economic and physical security”) to an age where the focus of fulfillment may be of self-expression and a “sense of meaning and purpose.”
  • And probably my favorite insight was this quote by WWII Jewish psychiatrist Viktor Frankl: “Being human, always points, and is directed, to something, or someone, other than oneself – be it a meaning to fulfill or another human being to encounter. The more one forgets himself – by giving himself to a cause to server or another person to love – the more human he is.”

Yet the subheading of the book *Crafting a Life That Matters, led me to believe that there is a how-to in there somewhere. While this book has great insight, I just wish there was a bit more instruction.

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Well Fed Weeknights
by Mel Joulwan 
(non-fiction, cookbook) – must read

I’ve been checking out cookbooks from the library for a while now (approximately one per week.) Then, if I love the cookbook, I buy it. I own Joulwan’s first two cookbooks. I’m so silly. While I don’t eat exclusively Paleo by any means, I love Mel’s cookbooks. She teaches you how to cook without you even knowing it. I’ve learned to and have become more comfortable improvising! While I like cumin, Joulwan seems to be obsessed with it. Sometimes the recipes don’t suit me for that reason, but I have learned what I do like! Now that I own it, I can’t wait to devour this book.

I love cookbooks that teach me how to cook real food.

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One Pan, Two Plates
by Carla Snyder (non-fiction, cookbook) – worth a read

My husband hates leftovers. They often end up as my work lunches or fill our freezer. I loved this idea of easy weeknight meals for two. Plus, the cover is beautiful. BONUS: Snyder suggests a wine or beer pairing with every recipe. One of the first recipes I tried out of this cookbook wasn’t actually for the two of us – but just for me. I had barley and lentils in my pantry that never made their way to the plate because Rob would never eat them. I made Snyder’s Barley and Lentil Salad for lunch one day (served warm). Delicious and filling, it made for a great, easy cold salad the following day, too. I can’t wait to try more of the recipes because…

I now own this cookbook, too!

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The Law of Attraction
by Esther and Jerry Hicks (non-fiction) – on the fence

I am always interested in reading up more on the Law of Attraction. This book has some really great nuggets of info, if you can get past some of the kooky ways the authors came about it. There were times I was about to put it down, but I’m glad I didn’t.

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Kitchens of the Great Midwest – Yes, AGAIN
by J. Ryan Stradal (fiction, audiobook) – MUST LISTEN *Highly Recommended

Rob and I took a trip to Iowa for a family wedding. I checked out two audio books based on the number of hours we’d be on the road. My first choice was The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood, read by Claire Danes. After a few paragraphs, Rob thought he’d read the book before. So I asked him if he’d like me to switch to my backup. As predicted, he loved this book as much as I did! If you love food, are addicted to the Food Network, like to cook and/or live in the Midwest, I think you’ll enjoy this book. I especially think you will enjoy the audio. The narrators are fantastic with just the right dose of Minnesota accents in my opinion. Stradal has me hoping he’ll write another book soon!

We had a few more tracks to finish upon our return from Iowa. So you know what we did? We opened a bottle of wine, popped the CD in our DVD player, lit some candles and listened to the ending.

For the record, I fully intend to listen to Handmaid’s Tale on audio. I know it’s also a television series at the moment, but I don’t think we get the station. On further reflection, Rob decided that he may not have read the book, but perhaps saw the previews to the television series!

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There are a lot of books that are now or are soon becoming movies or television adaptations this fall.

Which ones are hoping to read before viewing?

 

Cheers~
Carrie

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A Good Mix of 5 Books for Friday!

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A good mix of audio, thriller, cookbooks this week. Oh, and there’s that one about a dog… 🙂

OUTLANDER
by Diana Galbadon 
(fiction, audiobook) – DNF

I sort of  lied about not listening to audiobooks until this winter when my commute resumes… because there was this one. I’ve seen Outlander on so many must-read lists, but it is Just. So. Long. (Approx 860 pages.) My mother-in-law even said she loved it and that it truly was worth reading.

Then I spotted it on an audiobook list and thought about checking it out from the library, but realized that I with my 1 hr commute three days a week (at the time), I wouldn’t be able to get this 32+ hour audiobook back to the library when it was due. So I asked Rob if instead of listening to music on our drive to Michigan and back to visit his parents if he’d consider listening to an audiobook. He agreed.

After we got on the road and situated for our road trip, I popped in the first CD (there are 28!) and Rob said, “Oh, no! A Brit!?” I would agree that sometimes British narrators are difficult to follow, depending on the context of the book. But due to storyline, it was only appropriate because the main character is British. I told him to give it some time. It often takes me a bit to get used to the voice of any narrator when I start an audiobook. I told him that we could eject the CD and go back to radio any time he wanted. I was just glad he was open to the idea!

We loved the whole idea around this book! It did seem slow at some points and I will admit that my mind drifted a bit from time to time, but we kept listening. At one point, Rob asked what genre this was because it really was hard to tell. A quick google search led to a description of this story as romance. I wasn’t about to tell Rob that! He would have grimaced and stopped listening! Plus, it truly is much more than that. It starts out as part historical fiction and the time travel turns it into fantasy and war fiction and love and romance and then maybe… erotica? Oh boy! This book really does have it all.

After reading some reviews, I will agree that this book does take some time to get into and can be slow-moving, but the characters really develop into something special. However, Rob and I quickly realized that by the end of our trip, we were only going to get half way through all of the CDs!

At one point, I told Rob that we could pick this up on the TV series to move everything along a little more quickly. But in the end, as the book got better, we realized we’d miss listening to the book. We decided that we are going to pick up the audiobook again and finish the second half on our trip to Michigan in the fall.

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I See You
by Claire Mackintosh
 (fiction) – worth a read

After reading Mackintosh’s I Let You Go earlier this year, I put myself on the wait list for her second book. I found it funny that she addressed the issue of the “dreaded second novel” in her acknowledgments, about how that second one never quite compares… And I think that may be true with this one. It’s a great book, but very different. I loved the setting (Welsh countryside) and interesting twist midway through I Let You Go. This one takes place in the tubes of London. It’s quite creepy, but well-done. I love how most of her characters feel like real, average people.

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Cravings: Recipes for All the Food You Want to Eat
by Chrissy Teigen
 (cookbook) – worth a read

Tiegen makes a point in her book to say something to the effect that she didn’t want to write a cookbook about salads, but also that she didn’t want to write one that said, “Look at me! I can eat whatever I want!” {I don’t remember the exact words, so I’m paraphrasing here.} But truly, I kind of feel like the latter is exactly what she did!

This book is about flavor – and not compromising that. I chose a few recipes that I intend to make. Rob’s new fave obsession is Mexican Street Corn, so that is on the docket.  But to be quite honest, the recipes I have listed to try, tend to be the lightest ones out of the cookbook! Creamy Parmesan Skillet Eggs, Chunky Creamy Mushroom Soup and Sriracha Caesar Salad. Yes, please!

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A Dog’s Way Home
by W. Bruce Cameron (fiction) – MUST READ

I don’t think you know how long I’ve waited for this book. I first read Cameron’s A Dog’s Purpose a couple of years ago (way before the movie, which I have yet to see) and just loved the concept of a book written from a dog’s perspective. The way Cameron writes, too, is so compelling that when a chapter ends and I tell myself I’ll pause there, I want to keep reading because there is almost always a cliff-hanger!

I immediately read the follow-up book A Dog’s Journey. After finishing that book, I went in search of Cameron’s other books because I craved more books written from a dog’s point-of-view. Alas, those were his only two. I’ve read a couple of his other books, but was still longing for this style. A Dog’s Way Home did not disappoint. I again loved the perspective, the storyline and how it gripped my heart. Any dog lover should read and savor. These books are some of my favorites of all time.

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Twin Cities Chef’s Table:
Extraordinary Recipes from the City of Lakes to the Capital City
by Stephanie A. Meyer (non-fiction, cookbook) – worth a read

It’s almost a secret that our Twin Cities house some wonderful culinary delights. I have been touting for years that we live in a highly underrated foodie city! When I brought this book home from the library and put it on the coffee table, Rob thumbed through it and said, “Why don’t we HAVE this book?! We need to own it!”

This book was published in 2014 and it is so fun to read about some of our favorite places (we’ve been to about 25 of the restaurants listed in here), grieve those that have closed (approximately 10) and regret those that we never made it to before they closed. That being said, I wouldn’t realistically make any of the recipes out of this book. Maybe that’s why I am a diner at these restaurants, not a chef. 🙂

Still, only three years later, this book already has become a piece of history – illustrating top restaurants in the Twin Cities at a place in time. We all know how the dining culture evolves with trends coming and going. But one thing I think will remain the same for years to come: relying on farm fresh, local ingredients and sustainability whenever possible. The only thing that’ll change? The creative ways in which to use ingredients!

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Have you ever listened to audiobook with someone else?

Cheers~
Carrie