Tag Archives: chickpeas

Broccoli + Beans or Meat = Dinner Served

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You can read about how I declared this the Best Cookbook You’ve Never Read <– here.

You can read about the first recipe I cooked from this cookbook here.

You can read about how I cooked tuna and salmon – {from a can!} – for the first time here.

You can read about how I made a stir-fry for some friends and made salads without dressing here.

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But it was from this recipe out of 5 ingredients, 10 Minutes that I learned that if you have a bag of frozen broccoli and a half pound a meat or a can of beans, that you can have a dinner on the table any night of the week in just MINUTES…

Super Simple Broccoli with Almonds
Recipe Ingredients: broccoli, almonds, butter, lemon juice

I think this base recipe was originally meant to be a weeknight side dish. Here is a photo of the pic in the cookbook. Looks yummy, no?!

I was going to make this as a side to some burgers I whipped up for Rob and me one night. But as I’ve mentioned, Jules shares possible variations at the bottom of every recipe in her 5 ingredients, 10 Minutes cookbook.

Her variations help those with dietary restrictions and even the pickiest eaters among us whip up something delicious and healthy. I am not allergic to nuts. In fact, I love them as a nice added roasty crunch to a dish. However, when I read Jules’s nut-free variation of this dish, I knew I’d be making it as a meal for myself instead:

Nut-free: leave them out or replace with a small can of chickpeas

I adore chickpeas {Rob doesn’t} and knew this was going to make a wonderful lunch for me. And it was:

This dish may not sound nor look exciting to you; but the results are all in the preparation. That is why I wanted to provide you with a few notes on why/how this is such a fantastic, versatile dish:

Notes with my adaptations in blue:

  • The dish calls for one head broccoli. I took a bag of broccoli out of the freezer and thawed over night.
  • I cut the broccoli into smaller pieces than they came, cutting them into “little trees” as instructed and thinly slicing the stems. This helps the broccoli cook faster and those little bits will get such a nice char! {I also personally like smaller pieces of broccoli, that this sounds like an obvious step I should have been doing anyway.}
  • I also liked Jules’s tip to get the pan on the heat before you chop the broccoli to get it nice and hot.
  • The variation suggested a small can of chickpeas. I’ve never heard of such a thing, so I just drained and rinsed a whole can and dumped them in, creating a more substantial lunch.
  • Even with my chickpea/garbanzo bean substitute, I did add a few crushed almonds. They did seem to get a little bit soft in the pan. I think if I made this dish with nuts, I’d add them at the end next time.
  • I generously seasoned this dish while cooking and after it was finished. I also added a little extra drizzle of extra virgin olive oil. I don’t think adding garlic, red pepper flakes, nor shredded parmesan would hurt either!
  • You can find this recipe in Jules Clancy’s cookbook 5 ingredients, 10 Minutes or her blog The Stone Soup {sans almonds, but the technique is there.}
  • This dish took me 12 minutes to make, including chopping.
  • I’d make 800 variations of this again! Here’s why:

While Jules lists 5 different suggested variations at the bottom of this recipe, the final one reads:

More substantial: toss in a drained can of chickpeas or serve with some hummus. {Okay, so I realize now that I didn’t get the idea to use a whole can of chickpeas to make it more substantial by myself.} Or toss with hot pasta and your best quality extra virgin olive oil. Or add a drained can of tuna in oil, allow to warm through and serve with a wedge of lemon. Or team with a fried egg.

You see? All you need is a head of broccoli (or a bag reserved in your freezer) and either a can of beans / can of tuna or salmon / egg / scoop of hummus / box of pasta / pre-cooked protein such as diced chicken and you’ve got dinner on the table in minutes. I’m sure you could cook up some ground beef or turkey and mix it in, too.

The possibilities are endless.

Do you have a go-to formula to get something on the table quick based on ingredients in your fridge-freezer-pantry? If so, please share!

Cheers~
Carrie

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“Weird, Wild & Wonderful Foods”

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Subscription Box Saturday – Love with Food Edition

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Subscription Box: Love with Food

Premise:Sample the best gourmet food products delivered to your door!”

Cost: $10/month + $2 shipping. (Special deals if you purchase more than one month at a time)

Extra Benefits: Review products, share recipes and refer friends for points toward free products.

What’s Special: For each box shipped and each order placed, a meal is donated to a hungry child.

To Join: Click here.

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This month’s theme was Weird, Wild & Wonderful Foods with Andrew Zimmern. As a Minnesota resident, I know that I should be a Zimmern fan, but I’m not. I’ve read some of his articles in Mpls St. Paul Magazine and I’m often offended. It’s his condescending tone to the average diner. {However, now that I think of it, maybe I sound the same way with my views as a beer snob.} In addition, my husband often asks how someone who eats bugs can be looked up to and considered an expert on food. I guess that just means he is open-minded, so maybe I should be a little more open-minded about Zimmern himself, too.

The contents:

April Love With Food Box - Weird, Wild & Wonderful with Andrew Zimmern

April Love With Food Box – Weird, Wild & Wonderful with Andrew Zimmern

Fennel Pollen from Pollen Ranch – This is the only item that I have not yet sampled. I’m curious what this spice will taste like when incorporated into a dish. I can imagine it has an anise aroma or flavor. Attached to the packet is a recipe for a fennel polled-rubbed pork tenderloin. However, LWF is currently encouraging people to create their own recipes and upload pictures!

The Good Bean Smoky Chili & Lime Chickpea Snacks – I was really excited to try these because I love chickpeas. But surprisingly, they didn’t have much flavor. I only at half the bag.

Creamy Buffalo Ranch Dip from Bufflo Dip – The jar reads to check out their website online for ingredients and nutrition facts. It took me a while to find it. Please note the spelling: It’s Buff Lo Dip. I think that’s pretty easy to miss. In addition, their website is pretty basic, so they must be a start-up company. It was suggested to dip crackers or veggies in this dip, but I decided to mix it with a can of chicken to make my own Buff Lo Chicken Dip. It tasted fine, but I think I’ll stick to the concoction I discovered on Jen, a priorfatgirl’s site. It’s easy enough to make without having an open jar of something to worry about finishing.

Somersaults Salty Pepper Nuggets – What are these? Well, take a look!

I adored the flavor of these! But I also love it when fresh baked bakery or restaurant bread has a bunch of different unique seeds and grains in it. I would eat these as a snack anytime!

Mini Pops Air Popped Sorghum Grain – Itty  Bitty Butter – These were like mini pieces of popcorn only made with the sorghum grain instead! Again, they’d be good if there was more flavor, though. This was supposed to be butter-flavored, but all I tasted was salt.

Oloves Lemony Lover Olives – These didn’t taste any more different than regular olives to me. Were they supposed to be lemon-flavored? The packaging was very convenient to bring some olives to work with me, though! It gave me the idea that I really should pack olives in my lunch more. I should just use them more in general!

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Oloves Lemony Lover Olives – Ingredients & Nutrition Facts

However, there was another product hiding in the back of the box that was not pictured above:

cocmels

JJ’s Sweets Cocomels – Original & Sea Salt flavors

I absolutely love caramels, but these made with coconut milk made them even better! …love, Love, LOVE! They are vegan, dairy free and gluten free; thus, they are great for folks following those sorts of diets. I would totally recommend these to anyone, especially as a unique gift. I can’t imagine anyone NOT loving these!

These were all new foods to me, so they were great to try. In my opinion, the most weird, wild or unique food in the box was the fennel pollen. If I come up with a good recipe, I’ll be sure to post!

What food do you eat that may be totally weird, wild or unfamiliar to others?

Cheers~
Carrie