Tag Archives: Clean Soups

Soup (Book) Week: Clean Soups

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Welcome back to Soup Week, where I review the 5 latest Soup Cookbooks I’ve read.  Let’s get right to it.

But in case you missed it:

Clean Soups:
Simple, Nourishing Recipes for Health & Vitality
by Rebecca Katz (cookbook) – worth a flip

I really prefer soups made with real food. That is one of the reasons I chose to check this book out from our local library. What I didn’t know was that this book is really about how to do a soup cleanse! I feel they didn’t go with a title indicating such because the soups in this book are worth enjoying even if you aren’t doing a cleanse. The cleansing is a mere suggestion. The author just wants you to incorporate more healthy, revitalizing soup into your life!

BROTH

Katz states that once you make your own broth, you’ll never go back.

I have, but based only on suggestions on the interwebs to use up any leftover veg, bones or carcasses and throw in some herbs, spices and salt. I’ve never found my versions quite as flavorful as the box stuff. I think I know why. Katz’ recipes for broths are detailed – very detailed! I think the hardest thing about these broths for me is knowing that the ingredients to make them are then discarded and, in mind, WASTED! I guess I’m going to have to get over that. 🙂

That being said, there are still a number of ingredients in these broths I would never buy {like in this soup book}. Of her seven broth recipes, I could see myself making two of them. Her Magic Mineral Broth requires an 8-inch strip of kombu <–what? and 4 whole allspice or juniper berries. They aren’t listed as optional. I don’t know why, but whenever there is an ingredient listed that I’m not intrigued enough to venture out and try, I either need:

  1. The author’s extra encouragement to really give it a try because the ingredient will make it amazing or
  2. Their permission to skip it and it’ll still turn out lovely.

Otherwise, I shy away from the recipe completely.

She also indicates earlier in the book, which broths work best for which soups, but that they can usually be interchanged. I find this difficult to believe when her Thai Coconut Broth requires a coconut milk! I’m either going to have to suck it up and go find some lemongrass and kaffir leaves to make this broth or just skip the soup recipes that suggest it as the base. Or perhaps I could just add a can of coconut milk at the end? Hmm…

TYPES OF SOUP

She describes soups as blended or traditional. Blended soups are when all or part of the soup is put in a blender to create a creamy paradise. She goes one step further to call these velvety concoctions cashmere soups. I love that! I giggle now because I think about the time when I learned that my father-in-law prefers traditional soups. When we were on a family trip to Ireland, by the third or fourth lunch, he said, “Sure, I’ll try your vegetable soup, but you guys tend to pulverize the hell out of them!”

I know a lot of the soups in this book I’m shying away from because I don’t think I’ll ever make their accompanying broth base. Maybe it’s my intimidation that actioned me to put this book on my wish list at PaperbackSwap and Thriftbooks {<–referral links}. The photos really are alluring and taunting me with all that comforting goodness that comes with the warmth and aromatics of a good soup. It seems the chicken soups are the ones I marked most and the clean-out-the-fridge soup might be a staple in a pinch.

SOUP REVIEW

Here’s the thing… I did give one of the recipes a shot using regular boxed broth anyway: Provencal Lentil Soup. I pretty much already had the ingredients for it and instead of making the Many Herb Drizzle recipe listed in the back of the book, I substituted some deli pesto. Let me tell you, this soup was divine! This was supposed to make 6 servings, but since it was so low-cal, I divided it into 4 and the portions were very generous. I gave my husband a half-serving, just to taste… He wasn’t sure if he could eat lentils… and HE ATE THE ENTIRE BOWL!

I’ve since returned this book to the library. But it’s still on my wish list. I might have to give some of the other soups a try…

Have you made your own broth?
If so, what method do you use to ensure something flavorful?

Cheers,
Carrie

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