Category Archives: books

5 Books + New Beer!

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Another week has come and gone and *sigh*…. I still haven’t posted on anything except books! I have a lot I’d like to share; but I’m still in that “don’t want to be on the computer after sitting and working on one all day” mode.

What’s more? Our friends opened a new brewery in Shakopee last night! I did stop by to support; but instead of the old me, snapping photos at every opportunity, I did not take a single one. Instead, I just enjoyed the experience. It was really fun to see a bunch of our friends there, too! If you haven’t yet, please take a time to check out Shakopee Brewhall. They did an amazing job with which I thought was going to be the narrowest space tucked between Turtles and Arnie’s in downtown Shakopee. Instead, it feels quite roomy and is a perfect space for socializing!

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One reason I like to post about the books that I’ve read is that I want to remember themSince I went a whole month between stretches of posting on this blog, there are a few books that I don’t remember very well! That makes me sad. I teetered on whether I should post about them or not. I decided to post about them anyway!

Many of the books this week are how-to and cookbooks, but I’ve saved a little fiction for last. 🙂 Enjoy!

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Dinner: The Playbook
by Jenny Rosenstrach 
(non-fiction, cookbook) – worth a read

After loving Jenny’s (can I be so bold to address you by your first name, Jenny?!) first book, Dinner, A Love Story, I knew this would be another good one. It’s a different approach, though. Whereas Dinner, A Love Story was quite literally a story, Dinner, The Playbook is, well… a playbook. It’s your guide and how-to to get dinner on the table every. single. night… if you so desire. While it does focus on families and how to encourage picky eaters, I still felt this book could apply to me. With a husband who does not cook and would be content to eat out every night of the week, I sometimes need this. While she suggests enlisting the help of everyone in the family, even if it’s just to set the table, I find that one difficult. If dinner is anything but ordering and paying for it, my husband considers it too much work and not worth it! If I want to eat at home, I have to do the cooking and the dishes. (The trade off is that I don’t do any yardwork or vacuuming!)

One of the suggestions I did like, however, was when asked what is for dinner to casually say, “Hmmm… I haven’t decided yet,” even when you do know. That keeps any backlash at bay and makes things so much easier for you! I feel like this would work with my husband because whenever we would have something planned for an evening meal in, he wouldn’t be feeling it and would suggest going out instead. I have yet to try this on him!

After returning this book to the library, it promptly went on my PaperbackSwap.com and put it on my wishlist.

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Lose Weight by Eating
by Audrey Johns 
(non-fiction, cookbook) – worth a read?

Here is one of the cookbooks that I don’t remember much about. I don’t know how I hears about it; but I do know that I chose it because it focuses on real food. Still, I don’t remember the content nor the recipes! I liked it enough that I gave it 3 start out of 5 on Good Reads and put it on my PaperbackSwap.com. Hmmmm.

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Home Cheap Home: A Room-by-Room Guide to Great Decorating
by Budget Living (non-fiction, how-to) – skip it

Truth be told, this is a book from 2004 that I think I’ve owned since then, but have never read! I had it up for grabs on PaperbackSwap.com. When someone requested it, I figured I should probably give it a quick read, or at least flip-through, before I mailed it off. Now I know why I did not read this book – it is Not. For. Me. Surprisingly, I don’t think it’s really that out-dated in terms of style; but the ideas where not ones I would use. I hope the person who requested this book gets much better use out of it than I did!

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Organizing Solutions for People with ADD:
Tips and Tools to Help You Take Charge of Your Life and Get Organized

by Susan C. Pinsky (non-fiction, how-to) – worth a read

I have never been diagnosed with Attention Deficit Disorder; but I do believe we all can suffer from distraction from time to time. This book was written in 2006. I will say that some of the tips sounded condescending, even though the author has family members with ADD and has been helping others for years. I’m sure she didn’t intended it to be that way. Maybe I’m just sensitive to the language. In any case, I can’t even remember some of the tips. All I know is that simplifying seems to be best. Ease and efficiency is more important than special organizers or how something looks.  Items should be in reach and never take multiple steps to get to or put away because otherwise, they will not happen! I think that is good advice for anyone, not just those with ADD.

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Hello Sunshine
by Laura Dave (fiction) – worth a read

I loved the opening of this book! It was recommended by another blogger I follow. While I liked the storyline, I felt like the book fell flat by the end. I’m not sure there was any true climax. When I started reading this book, I was in the throes of watching Next Food Network Star. I kept seeing commercials for a show called I Hart Food with Hannah Hart. Hannah became my image of this book’s main character for that reason! Although I didn’t love the way the book fizzled out, I’m still intrigued to read her book Eight Hundred Grapes, which takes place in wine country!

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What are your favorite how-to books?

 

Cheers~
Carrie

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Hello? Anyone Still There?

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This post has been sitting in my in my draft box for a month! I have been working so much that the last thing I want to do is be on the computer at the end of the day. But I really do miss writing and this little old blog of mine, so I’m hitting publish on this one today! Hopefully, I’ll garner up the time and energy to share little tidbits about what’s been going on these parts this summer.

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My reading lists (aka Five for Friday: What I’ve Been Reading) are the easiest posts I can get out these days. I may need to take a different approach with this blog… I want to share more… especially on my travels… especially because we won’t be a for a while… but after being on the computer all day for work, I need to step out of my office and get OFFLINE. This is just how it is right now.

In any case, here’s what I’ve read recently.

The Adventures of Tom Sawyer
by Mark Twain 
(fiction, audiobook) – worth a listen

After listening to Pride and Prejudice on the Audible app for free with my Amazon Prime subscription, I felt like it was time to listen to Tom Sawyer, a classic book of which most of us know the story; but I’ve never read. Bonus: the narrator of this version is Nick Offerman – a comedian {you may know him from Parks and Rec} whose voice is perfect for this story, in my opinion.

I love the insight during the fence whitewashing scene is that nothing is fun if you get paid for it, but if you have the “privilege” of doing something instead of getting paid, the more likely you are going to want to do it for fun. Perspective!

Also, either it was common in literature use and write the word “presently” often during this time period, or this was a favorite word of Twain’s to use. So frequent, that you may find yourself getting drunk easily if you turned it into a drinking game.

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Cocaine Blues
by Kerry Greenwood 
(fiction) – worth a read

I learned about this book/series from Mel Joulwan, author of the Well Fed cookbooks that I adore. She did a post on Reading Day {which is somewhat like the unplug day Rob and I try to have a few times a year} and this was one she listed. I liked the fact that the story takes place in Australia during the 1920s. I tried to picture Melbourne during this time!  It’s a nice little mystery with a likable heroine. {No correlation with the title there! HA!} I liked the feminist themes, too.

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One Pot Paleo:
Simple to Make, Delicious to Eat and Gluten-free to Boot

by Jenny Castaneda (non-fiction, cookbook) – worth a flip

For those of you who eat Paleo, this book is not 100% Paleo. This doesn’t matter to me. I’m just a sucker for one-pot recipes with fresh ingredients! The author eats Paleo most of the time, but does also include some things in her diet such as rice. She is of Fillipino descent, so there a many interesting adaptations from that. What I didn’t know all this time, but learned from this cookbook is that there is much Spanish influence on Filipino cuisine!

I didn’t cook any recipes from this book, but still enjoyed flipping through it.

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Trout Caviar: Recipes from a Northern Forager
by Brett Laidlaw (non-fiction, cookbook) – worth a read

I found this book doing a trout search on my library website because I was in search of more trout recipes. {I have yet to post on our Lake Superior fishing trip earlier this summer!} This cookbook is great for the stories! {And you know how I love to read a cookbook like a novel!}

I enjoyed reading about how the author and his wife moved out to land to live in pretty much a shack in the middle of the woods, right here in the good ol’ Midwest! They do a lot of foraging and tend to eat off the land as much as possible. I didn’t find a trout recipe I would actually make but I did get a popcorn appetizer recipe that has me so intrigued!!!

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The Breakdown
by B.A. Paris (fiction) – worth a read

After reading Paris’s Behind Closed Doors, I put myself on the library waiting list for the her next book to hit the shelves. While I did not love it as much as Behind Closed Doors, I did devour this semi-thriller in a day while Rob was out of town. Her books are just hard to put down! I also liked reading this interview with the author. She didn’t start writing novels until she was 50!

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What’s been you favorite summer read this year?

 

Cheers~
Carrie

Friday Five: 2 Great Books + 3 Cookbooks

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Has it really been a month since I’ve last written? Well, I’ve been working my butt off, but also enjoying summer!

Anyway, I’ve been very lucky to have picked up two excellent books this time around. I didn’t know much about them, which I prefer. The cookbooks were mainly flip-throughs!

Love Warrior
by Glennon Doyle Melton 
(non-fiction) – MUST READ

I have not been through anything that this author has been through, nor did I know anything about the book going in. But I felt all the feels. It’s weird that I could relate to her probably for no other reason than pure, raw emotion.

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The Tucci Table
by Stanley Tucci 
(non-fiction, cookbook) – worth a flip

To be 100% honest, I found this cookbook because I did a search for “trout” on my library website. We recently went on a charter fishing trip with my parents and the haul of trout that we brought back will not be consumed by Rob nor my mother. I need recipes! This cookbook, while it didn’t deliver on the trout recipe I looked for, it does have a few really great traditional recipes and I loved reading the stories behind them. I found a recipe for Tuscan Tomato Soup, that I believe I’ll be making all winter long when tomatoes are not in season and I can use my fave canned San Marzanos! The author looked familiar to me and when I looked him, I realized why: Stanley Tucci is an actor.

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Serve Yourself: Nightly Adventures in Cooking for One
by Joe Yonan (non-fiction, cookbook) – worth a flip

 

Oh how excited I was to check out this cookbook! I’m not sure how I discovered it… I will tell you, it’s not for the novice cook. There are some great foodie-lover recipes; but other than the 12-Hour Tomatoes, I probably won’t be making anything from this book.

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DASH DIET DETOX
by Kate Barrington (non-fiction, cookbook) – skip

I was just looking for a few healthy recipes here, but I didn’t really find anything new.

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This is How It Always Is
by Laurie Frankel (fiction) – MUST READ

This was a popular book on my library wait list and on the Modern Mrs Darcy blog. A description I read at some point described a quirky family with secrets. This book is so much more than that. And it is a book that needed to be written now. It’s a book that I want to scream at the top of my lungs for everyone to read. It’s one of the best books I’ve read this year.

Highly Recommended. 

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What’s the best book you’ve read this year?

 

Cheers~
Carrie

Five for Friday: What I’ve been Reading

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Here’s what I’ve been reading/listening to lately… Things I may not have read had a known more about them!

The Bafut Beagles
by Gerald Durrell 
(non-fiction) – skip

Remember this book that I DNF because I left it behind in Michigan last fall when visiting my in-laws? Well, it was still on the night stand right where I left it when I returned over Memorial Day! I picked it back up because I really did want to finish it despite my first review:

 It was the last book I was reading on our trip to Michigan and I was having such a hard time pushing through it. It is an account of the author’s trip to the Cameroons in the 1949 for the collection of zoo specimens. I believe that is is non-fiction; but the book reads more like a novel and some of the accounts just seem unbelievable or embellished. But what do I know about such things or that era?

It was a difficult book for me to read because of some of the treatment of the animals, but would we know about so many animals in the world today if someone had not collected specimens?

I tried to take a different approach to reading the remainder of the book. Perhaps this could be one of the first travelogues! I tried to look at it from the perspective of someone visiting a new land. I got more of out of it this way, but it still wasn’t my favorite. Somehow, someway, another one of Durrell’s books ended up on my bookshelf. I just noticed it the other day. I wonder what that one will be like.

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Pride & Prejudice
by Jane Austen 
(fiction, audiobook) – worth a read/listen

I will admit that I had never read Pride & Prejudice until now. And this audio-version was highly recommended. I’ve shied away from audiobooks as of late just because I won’t be commuting for the next six months and won’t have too many long stretches alone in the car.

Still, when I learned that there Audible.com has free channels that Prime Members can listen to, I jumped on board! I don’t want to pay for an audible subscription, so this option was perfect for me. If you are an Amazon Prime member, you can download the free Audible App and after signing in with your Prime credentials, go to Channels. There are podcasts and such, but if you scroll down to the bottom there is a link to Audiobook Collections. Pride and Prejudice can be found under Celebrity Voices / Classic Stories. You can only stream books; however, you cannot download them, so keep your data plan in mind if you somewhere without wi-fi. (I downloaded this one only for walks, so that I’d want to get out there and walk so that I could listen!)

I will admit that this took me a bit to get into this book and my mind sometimes drifted. But I still followed the storyline without absorbing every word. With Audible, you can also slow down or speed up the audio. I find that depending on the book, 1.25 to 1.5x speed works well for me. I have no idea how anyone can listen to a book at 3x the speed, but I’m sure you can train your brain to get used to it!

I find that the book is a little slow-moving at first, but I do love the story! Coincidentally, I discovered the 5-hour, 2 CD British television version of this book (starring Jennifer Ehle and Colin Firth) sitting on our shelf in the weight room in the basement. My friend Jen lent it to me back when I had my back surgery back in 2013! It was time to return it. When Rob was out of town for a weekend, I watched it all… and this was during the time that I was listening to the book! I’d go for a long walk and listen and then I’d watch a section. I really did absorb more that way. And I will tell you that this is not an adaptation of the book like most movies are. This is almost word-for-word. I loved it and highly recommend both!

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Lucky Boy
by Shanthi Sekaran 
(fiction) – must read

I need to write a post about how I don’t like movie trailers because they reveal too much. I think the same is true for me and books. If I know too much about a book’s plot or premise, it may actually deter me from reading it. I’ve found there are many books that I never would have chose on my own have been some of my favorites!

This book is no exception. I read the book’s description after picking up the book from the library where I had it on hold. Hmmph… I thought. It was about two different mothers and their relationships and journeys through motherhood. There was no way that I was going to be interested or able to relate to this, having never been a mother myself.

But I was so wrong. 

This is one of those books I couldn’t put down. One of those books where when I was interrupted, I didn’t even realize that I was reading a book or that there was anything else going on around me – I was that present. I had to be jolted back to real life.

The thing that maybe I forgot when reading the description is that I didn’t have to relate to enjoy the book. It just has to be a well-written book that takes me to another time, another place, another life, another world. I mean, I loved Imbolo Mbue’s Behold the Dreamers and as an American-born woman, I obviously can’t relate to the immigrant experience. And Lucky Boy is about so much more than motherhood.

I highly recommend this book.

~

Eating in the Middle: A Mostly Wholesome Cookbook
by Andie Mitchell (non-fiction, cookbook) –worth a read

I read Mitchell’s memoir It Was Me All Along about her struggle with weight after having followed her old blog Can You Stay for Dinner? (It’s where I found this recipe!) Her writing is so heartfelt and her insights are so helpful having dealt with my own struggles on and off over the years.

After losing over 100 pounds, Mitchell found that her new challenge was to learn how to eat healthy but not deprive herself of the foods she once loved. This is what she describes as “Eating in the Middle”. You will find healthy recipes and tips on things she learned alongside recipes for sugary-made-from-scratch-make-for-company-or-share-with-friends indulgences. Still, I found that only a handful of the recipes appealed to me. Not always in terms of if they sounded good or not, but whether or not I’d actually make them. (I don’t bake, for example.)

One of the best parts I find about cookbooks, though, aren’t always the recipes, but what you can learn from the recipe creator. I love how Mitchell declares that she found that eating healthier in the morning set her up for a healthier day in general. Or that by making a point to eat a big healthy salad at lunch, she’d be sure to get her veggies in! Or that if she wants to eat something indulgent (like a pizza, which is tempting to overeat) to always fill up with veggies alongside.  All of these things aren’t new concepts; but when you hear them again, reiterated in how they were incorporated into someone’s life (not just as a “tip”), I think it goes a long way in seeing how it can be incorporated into your own.

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Truly Madly Guilty
by Liane Moriarty (fiction) – worth a read

 

This is the second Moriarty novel I’ve read. What I love most about her novels – every character is flawed. Nothing is cut and dry. But with this book, all I kept screaming in my head, “So tell me what happened at the barbecue already!!” I may have felt that way for a good while; but you do eventually find out. 🙂

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Does a book’s description deter you from reading a book?

 

Cheers~
Carrie

A Good Mix of 5 Books for Friday!

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A good mix of audio, thriller, cookbooks this week. Oh, and there’s that one about a dog… 🙂

OUTLANDER
by Diana Galbadon 
(fiction, audiobook) – DNF

I sort of  lied about not listening to audiobooks until this winter when my commute resumes… because there was this one. I’ve seen Outlander on so many must-read lists, but it is Just. So. Long. (Approx 860 pages.) My mother-in-law even said she loved it and that it truly was worth reading.

Then I spotted it on an audiobook list and thought about checking it out from the library, but realized that I with my 1 hr commute three days a week (at the time), I wouldn’t be able to get this 32+ hour audiobook back to the library when it was due. So I asked Rob if instead of listening to music on our drive to Michigan and back to visit his parents if he’d consider listening to an audiobook. He agreed.

After we got on the road and situated for our road trip, I popped in the first CD (there are 28!) and Rob said, “Oh, no! A Brit!?” I would agree that sometimes British narrators are difficult to follow, depending on the context of the book. But due to storyline, it was only appropriate because the main character is British. I told him to give it some time. It often takes me a bit to get used to the voice of any narrator when I start an audiobook. I told him that we could eject the CD and go back to radio any time he wanted. I was just glad he was open to the idea!

We loved the whole idea around this book! It did seem slow at some points and I will admit that my mind drifted a bit from time to time, but we kept listening. At one point, Rob asked what genre this was because it really was hard to tell. A quick google search led to a description of this story as romance. I wasn’t about to tell Rob that! He would have grimaced and stopped listening! Plus, it truly is much more than that. It starts out as part historical fiction and the time travel turns it into fantasy and war fiction and love and romance and then maybe… erotica? Oh boy! This book really does have it all.

After reading some reviews, I will agree that this book does take some time to get into and can be slow-moving, but the characters really develop into something special. However, Rob and I quickly realized that by the end of our trip, we were only going to get half way through all of the CDs!

At one point, I told Rob that we could pick this up on the TV series to move everything along a little more quickly. But in the end, as the book got better, we realized we’d miss listening to the book. We decided that we are going to pick up the audiobook again and finish the second half on our trip to Michigan in the fall.

~

I See You
by Claire Mackintosh
 (fiction) – worth a read

After reading Mackintosh’s I Let You Go earlier this year, I put myself on the wait list for her second book. I found it funny that she addressed the issue of the “dreaded second novel” in her acknowledgments, about how that second one never quite compares… And I think that may be true with this one. It’s a great book, but very different. I loved the setting (Welsh countryside) and interesting twist midway through I Let You Go. This one takes place in the tubes of London. It’s quite creepy, but well-done. I love how most of her characters feel like real, average people.

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Cravings: Recipes for All the Food You Want to Eat
by Chrissy Teigen
 (cookbook) – worth a read

Tiegen makes a point in her book to say something to the effect that she didn’t want to write a cookbook about salads, but also that she didn’t want to write one that said, “Look at me! I can eat whatever I want!” {I don’t remember the exact words, so I’m paraphrasing here.} But truly, I kind of feel like the latter is exactly what she did!

This book is about flavor – and not compromising that. I chose a few recipes that I intend to make. Rob’s new fave obsession is Mexican Street Corn, so that is on the docket.  But to be quite honest, the recipes I have listed to try, tend to be the lightest ones out of the cookbook! Creamy Parmesan Skillet Eggs, Chunky Creamy Mushroom Soup and Sriracha Caesar Salad. Yes, please!

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A Dog’s Way Home
by W. Bruce Cameron (fiction) – MUST READ

I don’t think you know how long I’ve waited for this book. I first read Cameron’s A Dog’s Purpose a couple of years ago (way before the movie, which I have yet to see) and just loved the concept of a book written from a dog’s perspective. The way Cameron writes, too, is so compelling that when a chapter ends and I tell myself I’ll pause there, I want to keep reading because there is almost always a cliff-hanger!

I immediately read the follow-up book A Dog’s Journey. After finishing that book, I went in search of Cameron’s other books because I craved more books written from a dog’s point-of-view. Alas, those were his only two. I’ve read a couple of his other books, but was still longing for this style. A Dog’s Way Home did not disappoint. I again loved the perspective, the storyline and how it gripped my heart. Any dog lover should read and savor. These books are some of my favorites of all time.

~

Twin Cities Chef’s Table:
Extraordinary Recipes from the City of Lakes to the Capital City
by Stephanie A. Meyer (non-fiction, cookbook) – worth a read

It’s almost a secret that our Twin Cities house some wonderful culinary delights. I have been touting for years that we live in a highly underrated foodie city! When I brought this book home from the library and put it on the coffee table, Rob thumbed through it and said, “Why don’t we HAVE this book?! We need to own it!”

This book was published in 2014 and it is so fun to read about some of our favorite places (we’ve been to about 25 of the restaurants listed in here), grieve those that have closed (approximately 10) and regret those that we never made it to before they closed. That being said, I wouldn’t realistically make any of the recipes out of this book. Maybe that’s why I am a diner at these restaurants, not a chef. 🙂

Still, only three years later, this book already has become a piece of history – illustrating top restaurants in the Twin Cities at a place in time. We all know how the dining culture evolves with trends coming and going. But one thing I think will remain the same for years to come: relying on farm fresh, local ingredients and sustainability whenever possible. The only thing that’ll change? The creative ways in which to use ingredients!

~

Have you ever listened to audiobook with someone else?

Cheers~
Carrie

5 for Friday – What I Read This Spring

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I’m a bit behind on what I’ve read and listened to, but here’s what was in front of me this spring… just before our trip to Charleston. FYI – There are some great ones/favorites in here!

The Artist
by Suzanne Hagelin 
(fiction) – on the fence

I’m guessing I found this book as a free download on the Amazon Kindle store. It had good reviews and I “purchased” it on a whim. Although I don’t own a tablet or e-reader, I like to have a few Kindle books on my phone in case I’m stranded in line somewhere without a book. I don’t tend to enjoy reading books on my phone. This was a shorter book with an intriguing premise; but I’m not sure I like how it unfolded. As usual, I’m just not fond of many endings to books.

~

Underground Railroad
by Colson Whitehead 
(fiction) – must read

This book has an ongoing, growing waiting list at my library and for good reason. I can’t say that I’ve ever read a historical novel like this. Whitehead is a wonderfully descriptive writer who captures such depth in imagining place and time you can almost feel it. I loved this book… the only part I didn’t was the ending. Because this piece could truly have kept on going.

~

Behold the Dreamers
by Imbolo Mbue 
(fiction, audiobook) – must read/listen

Somewhere along the way, I not only had reserved this on my to-read list, but also as one as I should listen to on audio. I would definitely agree that this is the route you should take there. This book probably rates up there as one of my favorite audiobooks of all time! The narrator has a phenomenal ability to do a wide range of voices and accents that feel completely authentic. In today’s world of immigrant debates, I think this book is highly relevant to our time.

~

Sheet Pan Suppers:
120 Recipes for Simple, Surprising, Hands-Off Meals Straight from the Oven
*Plus Breakfasts. Desserts. and Snacks, Too!

by Molly Gilbert (non-fiction, cookbook) – skip

This is one of those cookbooks where I started reading and got really excited about it. I love the idea of pulling an entire meal out of the oven all arranged and cooked on one pan. Then after putting the cookbook aside for a few days and returning to it later, I lost interest. I only found a couple of recipes I could actually find myself making.

~

Dinner: A Love Story
by Jenny Rosenstrach (non-fiction, cookbook/memoir) – must read

Kat at Tenaciously Yours posts weekly photos of her dinners and sites many of her meals as coming from Dinner: A Love Story. With my plan to borrow one cookbook per week from the library this year, this seemed a logical choice.

I completely adored this cookbook, but not for the reasons I thought! Since this book is part memoir, it does read just like a story… which is how I often read cookbooks anyway. After flagging several recipes, I decided to just purchase the cookbook myself. This is why it’s helpful to check cookbooks out of the library – you can decide whether or not you want to own them!

~

This is a sixth one, but I’m adding it because it’ll be my last audiobook for a while, until this winter when my commute resumes.

M Train
by Patti Smith (non-fiction, audiobook) – DNF

I had this on a list of recommended audiobooks. At the time, I didn’t know it was non-fiction, nor the content of the story. I am not familar with author Patti Smith either. At first listen, I couldn’t believe that they had her narrate her own book on audio. It was monotonous and dry and I had hard time paying attention. The writing is excellent, but I couldn’t get past her voice. But after a while, it grew on me. (Which often seems to be the case with audiobooks.) Then it just felt right that she was reading this memoir of sorts. Because it was her experience.

I did abandon this book however, because it was what I was listening to when my commute came to a halt. After that, I was in the car for no more than a few minutes at a time by myself. It didn’t make sense to keep going when I was having a hard time concentrating with my own circumstances as it was. But her experiences (and love of black coffee) and the content of the book is interesting enough that I may revisit when my commute resumes this winter.

What’s the best book you’ve read lately?

Cheers~
Carrie

5 for Friday – What I’ve Been Reading!

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It’s a been a while since I’ve read (or skipped) these, but here are my thoughts…

Eat Your Way To Happiness: 10 Diet Secrets to Improve Your Mood, Curb Your Cravings and Keep the Pounds Off
by Elizabeth Somer 
(non-fiction) – DNF/skip

I’m guessing I was interested in this book after reading The Happiness Diet, which I loved reading to explore the connection of mood to food. However, Eat Your Way to Happiness felt somewhat dated, focusing on low-fat foods and artificial sweeteners, so I quickly abandoned it.

~

The World’s Most Romantic Destinations:
50 Dreamy Getaways, Private Retreats, and Enchanting Places to Celebrate Love
by National Geographic
 (non-fiction) – must read

Why wouldn’t you want to read this beautiful book!? It’s great one to have sitting on your coffee table to thumb through when you are dreaming of a vacay with your sweetie. This book is for everyone. It covers destinations for adventurers, foodies, history buffs, beach bums… whatever you desire, they’ve got it all… as well as recommendations for the best-of-the-best most luxurious accommodations if you so desire.

 

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A Fatal Grace
by Louis Penny
 (fiction, audiobook) – worth a read/listen

This is the second book in the Arnaud Gamache series, set in Quebec. I read the first, Still Life, but listened to this one on audio. I think I enjoyed this one better than the first! And I really like all the little aspects and descriptions of Quebecois life added in. Such a treat. As much as I’m not a fan of winter, Louise Penny sure does know how to romanticize it!

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The Irresistible Introvert: Harness the Power of Quiet Charisma in a Loud World
by Michaela Chung (non-fiction) – skip

As an introvert myself, this book didn’t have much new for me. Some parts of the book felt almost like the author was really bashing on extroverts. I don’t think it was the intention, just the way in which she wanted to describe how introverts sometimes feel. There are tips for introverts on how to manage their energy, as well as interact with authenticity, which some might feel helpful

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Food: A Love Story
by Jim Gaffigan (non-fiction, audiobook) – worth a listen

By now, you may have realized that I like to listen to comedians’ audiobooks. Sometimes, I have a hard time listening to them at first, because the delivery doesn’t seem as natural as say, stand-up comedy, when they are reading their own book. But these books don’t take long to grow on me. Jim Gaffigan is no exception. While much of his stuff is over-the-top, some of it was hilariously relatable and such fun to have a little bit playing when Rob happened to be in the car with me.

What are your summer reading intentions?

Cheers~
Carrie